Previous WPBA tools

Information about the previous WPBA tools (August 2020) can be found here.

Old WPBA programme: minimum requirements

Trainees who do not transition to the new WPBA programme need to follow the old WPBA requirements.

The minimum evidence requirements described below are based on a standard three-year specialty training programme. The assessments need to be spread out throughout the training year.

For trainees who are less than full time the same number of assessments need to be completed per ‘training year’ (this will be longer than a calendar year). For example a trainee on a 50% less than full time rotation will take 2 years to complete a ‘training year’.

GP speciality training year one (ST1)

minimum requirements prior to 12 month review 6 x mini-CEX (if in secondary care) / COT (if in primary care) 
6 x CbD 
2 x MSF (each with a minimum of 5 replies from clinicians plus 5 non-clinicians if in primary care)
1 x PSQ (if in primary care) 
CEPS as appropriate
Clinical Supervisors Report from each hospital post

GP speciality training year two (ST2)

minimum requirements prior to 24 month review

6 x mini-CEX (if in secondary care) / COT (if in primary care) 
6 x CbD 
1 x PSQ (if in primary care and not already completed in ST1) 
CEPS as appropriate
Clinical Supervisors Report from each hospital post

GP speciality training year three (ST3)

minimum requirements prior to 36 month review
12 x CbD 
12 x COT / Audio-COT
2 x MSF (each with 5 clinicians and 5 non-clinicians)
1 x PSQ
CEPS – 5 mandatory and range of others
1 x audit / project
Basic Life Support – attach certificate into learning log

Every year

Regular entries of learning logs to document and reflect on learning
Documentation of any Significant Events in your learning log
PDP entries 
X2 Educational Supervisors Reviews
Documented evidence of child and adult safeguarding at level 3

WPBA assessments may vary depending on the nature of the training: ask your deanery/LETB for guidance.

Less than full-time trainees

The timescale of the WPBA minimum evidence requirements is different for trainees who are working less than full time.

Less than full time trainees (LTFTs) normally take WPBA assessments on a pro rata basis, according to the number of hours worked. However, it may be more than the pro rata equivalent; this will depend on your performance, progress and recommendations from your previous review.

You’ll have an educational supervisor’s review every six months, and a review of competence progression at least once a year.

Requirements for trainees on extensions to training

The minimum elements of WPBA for the training level (ST1, 2 or 3) need to be continued in order to demonstrate the development of competence, particularly in areas that have been identified as requiring improvement. Further assessments may be also needed to show this. The ARCP panel should detail any extra assessment requirements over and above the minimum number.

Four-year academic training programmes

There are a small number of four year academic training programmes across the UK. A common arrangement is that the ST3 phase of training is lengthened to two years and is split, with 50 per cent of the trainee’s time spent in general practice and the remaining 50 per cent spent in an academic post.

The WPBA  requirements that usually apply to ST3 are split across two years, as with any Less than Full Time (LTFT) trainees .

You’ll have additional academic assessments, and you’ll be expected to reflect the academic nature of your post in a good proportion of Learning Log entries.

Additional ST4 years

Some LETBs/deaneries have developed four year schemes. Trainees normally apply internally for one of these once appointed to GP training. There are a variety of possible formats to this training and as a result the WPBA requirements in ST4 are bespoke, addressing the trainee’s learning needs and reflecting the nature of the ST4 post. The deanery/LETB will issue local guidance in conjunction with the RCGP.

As an ST4 trainee you will need to maintain a clinical component throughout ST4, so you can demonstrate competence for CCT purposes.

Case based Discussion (CbD)

The Case-based Discussion (CbD) is a structured interview designed to assess your professional judgement in clinical cases. CbD is one of the tools used to collect evidence for your Trainee ePortfolio, as part of the Workplace Based Assessment component of the MRCGP exam.

How Case-based Discussion (CbD) works

The CbD tool has been designed to be used in both hospital and GP settings. For information about who can complete CbD, please see the guidance on who can act as an assessor for workplace based assessments.

Selecting cases for CbD

As a GP trainee, you're responsible for selecting cases, requesting a CbD and ensuring the paperwork is completed properly. You and your trainer should ensure that your ePortfolio reflects a balance of cases, including:

  • children
  • mental health
  • cancer and palliative care
  • older adults

Cases should also reflect different contexts: surgery, home visits and out-of-hours contacts. You can't include cases that have already been used as a debrief.

Specialty training years one and two (ST1 and ST2)

In ST1 and ST2, you'll select two cases. You present the clinical entries and relevant records to your clinical supervisor or educational supervisor one week before the discussion. Your clinical or educational supervisor selects one of these cases for discussion.

Specialty training year three (ST3)

In ST3, you'll present four cases to your trainer or educational supervisor one week before the discussion. They will select one or two for discussion.

What's covered in the discussion

The discussion is framed around the actual case rather than hypothetical events. Questions should be designed to elicit evidence of competence: the discussion should not shift into a test of knowledge.

Your trainer or educational supervisors will aim to cover as many relevant competences as possible in the time available. It's unrealistic to expect all competences to be covered in a single CbD, but if there are too few you won't have sufficient evidence of progress. It's helpful to establish at the start of the discussion which competence areas your trainer or supervisor is expecting to look at.

The trainer or educational supervisor records the evidence harvested for the CbD in the Trainee ePortfolio, against the appropriate competences.

It is recommended that each discussion should take about 30 minutes, including the discussion itself, completing the rating form and providing feedback.

When the CbDs happen

In full-time training you'll need to carry out a minimum of six CbDs in each of ST1 and ST2. In ST3, you carry out 12 CbDs.

These minimum requirements apply whether you're in a placement in primary or secondary care. You can do more CbDs if your trainer agrees - for example, if you're short of evidence in a particular competence area.

CbD form and guidance

CbD question generators

Consultation Observation Tool (COT) for use in primary care only

Trainers use the Consultation Observation Tool (COT) to support holistic judgements about your practice on primary care placements. COT is one of the tools used to collect evidence for your Trainee ePortfolio, as part of the Workplace Based Assessment component of the MRCGP exam.

How the Consultation Observation Tool (COT) works

Your assessor reviews a number of your patient consultations - either video recordings or by direct observation. You’ll use the resulting discussion and feedback as evidence for your Trainee ePortfolio. For information about who can complete COT and Audio-COT, please see the guidance on who can act as an assessor for workplace based assessments.

Selecting consultations for COT

Either record a number of consultations on video and select one for assessment and discussion, or arrange for your trainer to observe a consultation. Complex consultations are likely to generate more evidence.

Consultations should be drawn from your entire period of GP training, reflecting a range of patient contexts. You can include consultations in different contexts – for example, a home visit.
You should include at least one case from involving:

  • children (a child aged 10 or under)
  • older adults (an adult aged more than 75 years old)
  • mental health

It’s inadvisable for a consultation to be more than 15 minutes in duration, as the effective use of time is one of the performance criteria.

When you’re selecting a recorded consultation, it’s natural to choose one where you feel you’ve performed well. This isn’t a problem: the ability to discriminate between good and poor consultations indicates professional development.

But don’t spend a lot of time recording different consultations. COT isn’t a pass/fail exercise: it’s part of a wider picture your practice.

Patient consent

The patient must give consent, in accordance with the guidelines for consenting patients.

Collecting evidence from the consultation

You’ll have time to review the consultation with your trainer, who will relate their observations to the WPBA capability framework and COT criteria. The trainer then makes an overall judgement and provides formal feedback, with recommendations for further development.

When you use the COT

You’ll require a minimum of six COTs in each of ST1 and ST2. If you’re in full-time training, make sure you do three before each six monthly review.

In ST3 you’ll need 12 COTs (six before each six monthly review, if you’re in full time training).

Observations in secondary care posts

During secondary care posts you’ll use the Clinical Evaluation Exercise (miniCEX) rather than COT to record consultation observations.

The point of transition between COT and miniCEX may vary if you spend part of your final year in hospital posts.

COT forms and guidance

Audio-COT

General Practice has evolved, and more and more consultations are being carried out by phone. Different skills are needed to carry out a consultation safely and appropriately on the phone from those needed for face-to-face consultation.

The Audio-COT form that has been developed would be expected to be used for at least one COT in ST3, and further ones would be encouraged. A total of three Audio-COTs can contribute towards the overall total of COTs required in ST3.

Audio-COT would not be expected as part of the minimum numbers of COTs in ST1/2. The Audio-COT is encouraged in ST1/2 whilst in a GP placement but it will not count towards the overall total number of COTs in these training years.

The Audio-COT guidance, assessment form and consent form can be seen below.

Multi-Source Feedback (MSF)

The Multi-Source Feedback (MSF) tool is used to collect colleagues’ opinions on your clinical performance and professional behaviour. It provides data for reflection on your performance and self-evaluation. MSF is one of the tools used to collect evidence for your Trainee ePortfolio, as part of the Workplace Based Assessment component of the MRCGP exam.

How the Multi-Source Feedback (MSF) tool works

Preparing for the MSF

Agree dates to conduct the MSF with your trainer or supervisor, and set aside time discuss the feedback generated after the closing date.

Then select your respondents.

  • In secondary care, five clinicians who know your work well; they should come from a range of roles and include people with a range of seniority.
  • In primary care, five clinicians (mainly established GPs) and five non-clinicians

In both settings it is important to choose people who know your work through working alongside you.

Conducting the MSF

Provide respondents a letter explaining the MSF process and giving the closing date. Make sure your educational supervisor knows which colleagues you’ve asked to take part.

Respondents participate by clicking on ‘Assessment forms’ under the Trainee ePortfolio login box. Using the ticket code you’ve generated from your ePortfolio to indicate who they are providing feedback about, they provide grades on a seven point scale and enter comments in two free-text boxes.

Clinicians will answer both sections: non-clinicians just answer just the first section.

Using a variety of respondents

It’s good practice to get opinions from as many different colleagues as possible. This may be difficult in small practices, but try not to duplicate respondents across MSF cycles.

Checking MSF participation

Your educational supervisor will contact a sample of respondents to check that they did contribute to the MSF. Neither of you should have access to information connecting individuals with responses: responses are anonymous.

Using MSF feedback

Your educational supervisor will have access to the anonymised results once the MSF closes. Once authorised by the educational supervisor, the results will be available to you and your trainer through your Trainee ePortfolio.

You’ll then have a feedback interview and an opportunity to reflect on the results. You can record this discussion and the resulting action plan as a ‘professional conversation’ in your Trainee ePortfolio Learning Log.

When you use the MSF

You complete two cycles of MSF during ST1 and two cycles in ST3.

MSF form and guidance

Patient Satisfaction Questionnaire (PSQ) for use in primary care only

The Patient Satisfaction Questionnaire (PSQ) provides patient feedback on your empathy and relationship-building skills during consultations. PSQ is one of the tools used to collect evidence for your Trainee ePortfolio, as part of the Workplace Based Assessment component of the MRCGP exam.

How the PSQ works

Preparing for the PSQ

Agree dates for the PSQ and feedback interview with your trainer. The questionnaires and letters of explanation should be handed to consecutive patients by the practice receptionist, irrespective of their likelihood of responding.

Patients should complete the questionnaire and hand them back to the receptionist. Continue until a minimum of 40 completed forms have been returned (this may take a number of days). We recommend that this process is done using paper copies.

The results will be entered into your Trainee ePortfolio. Each deanery has its own arrangements for doing this, but it’s usually delegated to the practice team.

Do not throw away the PSQs until you have completed your training as they may be required for auditing purposes, or re-submitted if there are any technical issues.

Using PSQ feedback

Once summarised (which takes around 24 hours), the results are sent to your educational supervisor. Results are anonymous and include the mean and median range of results and the lowest and highest score for each question. Questions are marked on a scale of 1 - 7:

Rating Key

1. Poor to Fair 2. Fair 3. Fair to Good 4. Good 5. Very Good 6. Excellent 7. Outstanding

Once they’ve been authorised by your educational supervisor, you and your GP trainer will be able to access the results through your Trainee ePortfolio.

You’ll then have one or more feedback sessions, and an opportunity to reflect on the results. You can record this discussion and the resulting action plan as a ‘professional conversation’ in your Trainee ePortfolio Learning Log.

PSQ form

This copy of the form is provided for information. For your own work, please download the version available on the Trainee ePortfolio.

Clinical Examination and Procedural Skills (CEPS) and Intimate Examination guidance

Summary

It is essential you learn how to examine patients within the general practice setting.

To be awarded your CCT, evidence for both of the following must be included:

  • Five mandatory intimate examinations. A suitably trained professional will need to observe and document your performance on a CEPS evidence form.
  • A range of Clinical Examination and Procedural Skills relevant to General Practice.

Introduction

Competent Clinical Examination and Procedural Skills are fundamental to effective general practice. Relevant evidence for this capability needs to be gathered regularly throughout each review period and recorded in your ePortfolio. As with the other capabilities there are a set of word descriptors to help you reflect on your progression as you acquire these skills.

Which skills need to be assessed

There are five intimate examinations, which need to be specifically included, as these are mandated by the GMC. These include breast, rectal, prostate, male genital examinations and female genital examination, to include speculum examination and bimanual pelvic examination. You need to be observed performing these examinations by a suitably trained professional. The assessor records their observation on the CEPS evidence form. If this is another doctor they must be at ST4 level or above. If the colleague is another health professional - such as a specialist nurse - they must confirm their role and training so that your Educational Supervisor can be satisfied that they have been appropriately trained. You may also decide to write a log entry on any of these specific skills but this would be in addition to the CEPS evidence form.

It is also important to note that this is not an exhaustive list of intimate examinations and indeed any examination can be considered intimate by some patients (for instance, a competent examination of the eye with an ophthalmoscope), but the examinations listed are those that, due to their particularly intrusive nature, need to be specifically observed, and commented on during your training.

The five mandatory examinations are not a 'minimum requirement' and cannot by themselves demonstrate overall competence in CEPS. A range of CEPS which are relevant to general practice are also required. This again is not an exhaustive list, nor is there a set minimum number as everyone has different needs. You are expected to document your performance in CEPS in your learning log and /or discuss your learning needs during placement planning meetings with your supervisor. The range of examinations, procedures and the number of observations will depend on your particular requirements and the professional judgement of your clinical and educational supervisors.

For example, you may recognise that your learning needs are joint examinations, the examination of the eye or doing a newborn baby check and if needed, you can discuss with your supervisor how these can be addressed. Your supervisor may also recognise areas that need addressing such as how to do a neurology examination within a GP-length consultation or examine a diabetic patients feet correctly.

You may already be aware of specific CEPS you want to address but these can equally become apparent during your consultations with patients.

In addition, it is important to recognise the procedures you may need during emergency presentations in General Practice; for example can you explain to a patient who is having an asthma attack what you are going to do, set up and start them on a nebuliser?

Completion of CEPS

These can occur in a variety of ways and these include;

  1. CEPS evidence form (in the evidence section of the ePortfolio)
  2. Learning logs (there is a filter for CEPS entries)
  3. Mini-CEX
  4. COT (criterion 6 refers to examination skills)
  5. MSF
  6. CSR

You will not be able to be signed up as competent in CEPS by your Educational Supervisor during your final review, unless there is observed evidence of the 5 mandatory intimate skills and a range of CEPS relevant to General Practice. This will also be reviewed at your ARCP and an unsatisfactory outcome given if these are not present.

Educational Supervisor Reviews

The evidence will be reflected on and summarised in the ESR every 6 months along with the evidence for other competences. At each review the ES will be expected to respond to the following questions:

  1. Are there any concerns about the trainees’ clinical examination or procedural skills? If the answer is ‘yes’, please expand on the concerns and give an outline of the plan the trainee needs to follow for these to be rectified.
  2. For all trainees: Has the trainee demonstrated progression in their Clinical Examination and Procedural Skills, commensurate with their stage of training, during the period under assessment? Please comment specifically on breast, rectal, prostate, male genital and female pelvic examinations.
  3. For final review only: Is the trainee competent in breast, rectal, prostate, male genital and female pelvic examinations? Please refer to specific evidence including Learning Log entries, CEPS, COTs and CbDs etc. 

Useful links

Frequently asked questions

What is the range of evidence I need for CEPS?

Apart from the five mandatory examinations as required by the GMC it will be up to you to discuss your learning needs with your Educational Supervisor.  The CEPS to be considered and the range of evidence required will depend on various factors such as your prior experience and the nature of your current placement.  Remember that you are training to be a GP and so procedures that are unlikely to be performed in a GP setting, whilst interesting to reflect on, are not so relevant.  Nevertheless all examinations and procedures have some common features such as the need to gain consent and the need to consider the comfort of the patient.

What are intimate examinations? Is there a definition?

There is no agreed definition of what constitutes an intimate examination.  The five examinations for which evidence of competence is required by the GMC are generally accepted examples of intimate examinations but there are many others.  For instance, the competent examination of the eye with an ophthalmoscope is considered by many, if not most, patients to be an intimate examination, especially as it requires the examination room to be darkened.  Ultimately it is the individual patient who determines what is intimate or invasive for them and this will be determined by a number of possible factors including their prior experiences, their religion and their cultural background.

How many CEPS do I need to do?

There is no set number. There needs to be enough to demonstrate, to your Educational Supervisor’s satisfaction, your competence in CEPS.

What is the standard of clinical examination expected?

The standard is that of an independent fully qualified General Practitioner.  As well as the technical aspects of examination and the ability to recognise abnormal physical signs, it includes the choice of examination best suited to the clinical context. For instance, a competent GP very rarely performs an extensive neurological examination but will perform a limited neurological examination as determined by the history taken from the patient.

Can CEPS be assessed in a skills lab?

Training in a skills lab and the use of manikins can be a very helpful adjunct to training in the work place.  In general, and certainly in the case of the five intimate examinations as required by the GMC, this will not be sufficient evidence of competence without the demonstration that your skills can be applied in a clinical context.

Would an observed full insurance medical examination be enough evidence?

Although being observed performing such an examination might be helpful it would be unlikely to provide sufficient evidence of clinical competence.  For instance, the extent of the examination in such a situation is determined by the insurance company and not by the clinician.

If I have demonstrated competence in an intimate examination does this need to be repeated?

No, if your Educational Supervisor is satisfied that the evidence you have provided for one of the five intimate examinations as required by the GMC is sufficient this does not need to be repeated.  However, it is important that this evidence is recorded in such a way that you can remember where it is.  The easiest ways to do this is to use the CEPS forms.  At the final review before a Certificate of Completion of Training (CCT) is recommended your Educational Supervisor will need to answer a specific question in relation to these examinations.

What if I am unable to complete a CEPS due to disability?

All GP trainees regardless of whether they have a disability need to meet the required competences to ensure patient safety is maintained. This though includes having the insight to recognise when your disability prevents an examination from being completed, understanding which examination is needed and that it is a necessary part of the consultation, being able to facilitate your patient having the examination in a timely fashion and demonstrating that you know what to do with the findings.

Clinical Evaluation Exercise (MiniCEX) for use in hospital posts only

The Clinical Evaluation Exercise (miniCEX) assesses clinical skills, attitudes and behaviours in a secondary care setting. It’s one of the tools used to collect evidence for your Trainee ePortfolio, as part of the Workplace Based Assessment component of our MRCGP exam.

How miniCEX works

The miniCEX provides a 15-minute snapshot of how you interact with patients in a secondary care setting.

Preparing for miniCEX

Each miniCEX should represent a different clinical problem, and you should have drawn samples from a wide range of problem groups by the end of the speciality training years one and two (ST1 and ST2).

Conducting miniCEX

The miniCEX can be assessed by the clinical supervisor and we would encourage that the clinical supervisor who will go on to complete the trainee's clinical supervisor report does at least one of the miniCEXs required, a consultant or a hospital doctor ST4 or above (or SAS equivalent). The observer should not be a peer - a fellow GP trainee or specialty trainee at a similar stage in training.

The assessor needs to have received the appropriate training to complete the assessment.

Using miniCEX feedback

The observer will give you immediate feedback and the evidence will be rated and recorded in your Trainee ePortfolio. You’ll develop a learning plan based on the strengths and developmental needs observed and record it in the Learning Log within your ePortfolio.

When you take miniCEX

You’ll be expected to undertake six observed encounters (three before each six month review, if you’re in full time training).

Observations in primary care posts

During primary care posts you’ll use the Consultation Observation Tool (COT) rather than miniCEX to record consultation observations.

miniCEX form

Clinical Supervisors Report (CSR)

The Clinical Supervisors Report (CSR) is a short, structured report from your clinical supervisor in each hospital post. Recorded in your Trainee ePortfolio, CSRs form part of the Workplace Based Assessment (WPBA) component of our MRCGP membership exam.

How the Clinical Supervisors Report (CSR) works

Developed through consultation with primary and secondary care educators and supervisors, the CSR is designed to be easy to focussed and easy to complete. It can be used by clinical supervisors in primary or secondary care, but it’s primarily intended to gather information during hospital posts.

Assessment of competence through the CSR

The CSR brings together the 12 competences from the WPBA framework in four ‘clusters’: relationship, diagnostics, management and professionalism.

Concentrating on areas that can be reasonably assessed in secondary care, it provides material for to the ‘naturally occurring evidence’ in ‘forms contributed’ within your Trainee ePortfolio.

Competence rating scale

The rating scale assumes that all trainees ‘need further development’ (NFD) and encourages assessors to make comparisons with doctors at the same stage of training. This scale proved successful in trials because it is one that secondary care doctors are used to working with. If a trainee is performing above expectations, this can be recorded and reflected in the text boxes.

Completing a CSR

The CSR will be completed by the named clinical supervisor (usually a consultant in the specialty), after they’ve reviewed all the evidence relating to your post (including the mandatory WPBA tools, ePortfolio log entries and feedback from staff and colleagues).

All sections of the CSR form need to have text entered. In particular, the ’Comments/concerns’ box is a very important way of giving feedback to the educational supervisor (ES) and should be used for each area of competence.

The final feedback box is used by the clinical supervisor to provide further information, or recommendations to help either you or your educational supervisor. The CSR is a particularly useful piece of evidence used by your ES when they complete your ESR.

CSR form

Direct Observation of Procedural Skills (DOPS) was an active WPBA tool until November 2015. Any completed DOPS can be accessed in the portfolio and can support the Clinical Examination and Procedural Skills (CEPS) capability. CEPS provides a more comprehensive system to demonstrate these skills.

Transition arrangements: Introduction of new Portfolio and new programme of WPBA

All GP Specialty Trainees will move onto the new Portfolio platform and the old ePortfolio information will remain accessible for those who are already progressing through the training programme. 

All trainees will be using the new log entry template and using the new assessment forms, irrespective of which WPBA programme they are following.

Everyone must be on the new WPBA programme within 2 years from the date of its introduction.

General Principles

All trainees need to be on the new WPBA programme within two years of 05.08.2020.

Trainees will move onto the 'new’ programme when they change training years ie when moving from ST1 to ST2, ST2 to ST3 etc. This is irrespective of whether the trainee is full-time or on a less than full time rotation.

In any training year if the trainee has passed the mid-point of that training year it is recommended they stay on the ‘old’ programme. (The training year will be more than a calendar year if the trainee is less than full time.)

In any training year, if the trainee has not passed the mid point of that training year, it is recommended they move to the new programme. For any trainee on an extension they should stay on the old programme.

For any trainee on leave at the time of transition, the same rules apply. If they have passed the midpoint of their training year when they return back into training then it is recommended they stay on the old programme. 

If they have not passed the mid point of their training year on their return then it is recommended they move to the new programme - this ensures that the remainder of their training time (including periods of leave) from the transition point of 05.08.2020 does not breach the two year point from the introduction of the new WPBA programme.

For any trainee who does not think they will complete their current training year (including periods of leave) by 05.08.2022 then they must move onto the new programme.

If any trainee is nearing two years from the introduction of the new WPBA programme and has not reached a ‘gateway’ ARCP then they need to contact their Deanery/LETB so they can be moved onto the new programme.

WPBA transition FAQs

The College has developed some FAQs to address the most common questions regarding the introduction of the new WPBA programme.

When should I move onto the new WPBA programme?

Trainees will move onto the 'new’ programme when they change training years ie when moving from ST1 to ST2, ST2 to ST3 etc. This is irrespective of whether the trainee is full-time or on a less than full time rotation.

In any training year if the trainee has passed the mid-point of that training year it is recommended they stay on the ‘old’ programme. (The training year will be more than a calendar year if the trainee is less than full time.)

In any training year, if the trainee has not passed the mid point of that training year, it is recommended they move to the new programme. For any trainee on an extension they should stay on the old programme.

I was on leave at the time of transition. What should I do?

The same rules apply as outlined above. If trainees have passed the midpoint of their training year when they return back into training then it is recommended they stay on the old programme. If they have not passed the mid point of their training year on their return then it is recommended they move to the new programme - this ensures that the remainder of their training time (including periods of leave) from the transition point of 05.08.2020 does not breach the two year point from the introduction of the new WPBA programme.

What’s the latest possible date for moving on to the new programme?

All trainees need to be on the new WPBA programme within two years of 05.08.2020. For any trainee who does not think they will complete their current training year (including periods of leave) by 05.08.2022 then they must move onto the new programme.

If any trainee is nearing two years from the introduction of the new WPBA programme and has not reached a ‘gateway’ ARCP then they need to contact their Deanery/LETB so they can be moved onto the new programme.

I will be on the ‘old’ WPBA programme. Do I need to do the prescribing assessment?

No, only trainees on the new WPBA programme need to do the prescribing assessment.

I am on the ‘old’ WPBA programme. Does the new FourteenFish Trainee Portfolio still support the ‘old’ programme?

Yes, if you are on the ‘old’ programme you can still use the FourteenFish Trainee Portfolio, however the Portfolio won’t reflect the ‘old’ requirements in terms of numbers of assessments etc. You will also need to use the new assessment forms to complete your assessments.

I need to complete a PSQ as part of my WPBA requirements. Can I do this electronically?

Yes, the FourteenFish Portfolio will enable trainees to undertake a PSQ electronically, rather than handing out paper copies.

Additional guidance

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